NOVEMBER 27, 2018

Creating a Family History in 2018

Organize all your collected information into one manuscript or scan to a file or storage disk.

You may choose to organize your files chronologically, by family generation, by specific families, or by individuals.

Make copies for the people you plan to share them with. Make abbreviated books for friends.

One of the most popular books for most non-professionals is a family history. Putting together a simple book that can be shared with your family members can be fun but it is also a lot of work.
Involving your kids, if you have any, can turn this into a family activity. Children and teens alike might like drawing family pets or houses where they’ve lived. Some will warm to the idea of self-portraits. Of course, the trusty cell phone can help them take pictures to include.
At some point, you can help them create a family tree. This can be helpful, but be aware that difficult issues can arise. Think of how each family member will react to the information included: divorces, deceased infants, suicides, adoptions, and other events may not be known by everyone who will see this information.
I will post this each month as a reminder to be cautious about information you share. Better safe than sorry!
Consider interviewing relatives, too; their stories are often treasures. Ask them for copies of old photographs of people and places. Don’t limit this to family. One of the things that makes these histories so interesting is pictures of friends, places of worship, schools, and favorite vacation spots.
I will be posting a suggestion each month for an activity that will help you focus your efforts. I think most of these can be done in less than four hours a month. You can spend more time if your interest is piqued.

Commitment to Your Art

 

 

Presentation and promotions. Edit/ spell check everything, including images. Credit others work.

 


 

Creative Spark

“One of the things my parents taught me, and I’ll always be grateful as a gift, is to not ever let anybody else define me; that for me to define myself . . . and I think that helped me a lot in assuming a leadership position.”

(Wilma Mankiller, Mankiller: A Chief and Her People)

Cougar

December Events

Christmas Eve (24)

Christmas Day (25)

New Year’s Eve (31)

 

 

 

Committing to Your Creative Life

 

Putting Ideas into Writing

 

 

Creative Sparks and Marketing Opportunities for +++month?+++

 

 

 

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OCTOBER 23, 2018

Creating a Family History in 2018

Write a letter to future generations. Ask your children, parents, and grandparents to do the same.

Write one to past generations, too. What are you grateful they did?

One of the most popular books for most non-professionals is a family history. Putting together a simple book that can be shared with your family members can be fun but it is also a lot of work.
Involving your kids, if you have any, can turn this into a family activity. Children and teens alike might like drawing family pets or houses where they’ve lived. Some will warm to the idea of self-portraits. Of course, the trusty cell phone can help them take pictures to include.
At some point, you can help them create a family tree. This can be helpful, but be aware that difficult issues can arise. Think of how each family member will react to the information included: divorces, deceased infants, suicides, adoptions, and other events may not be known by everyone who will see this information.
I will post this each month as a reminder to be cautious about information you share. Better safe than sorry!
Consider interviewing relatives, too; their stories are often treasures. Ask them for copies of old photographs of people and places. Don’t limit this to family. One of the things that makes these histories so interesting is pictures of friends, places of worship, schools, and favorite vacation spots.
I will be posting a suggestion each month for an activity that will help you focus your efforts. I think most of these can be done in less than four hours a month. You can spend more time if your interest is piqued.

Commitment to Your Art

 

Keep a list of tasks to do when your muse is asleep.

 

 

 


Creative Spark

“I had rather be shut up in a very modest cottage with my books, my family and a few old friends, dining on simple bacon, and letting the world roll on as it liked, than to occupy the most splendid post, which any human power can give.”

(Thomas Jefferson, Letters of Thomas Jefferson)

November Events

Veterans’ Day

Thanksgiving Day

 

SEPTEMBER 25, 2018

Creating a Family History in 2018

Create a family portrait. Take photos outside to take advantage of autumn views. Cell phones are fine for this. If your phone has video, don’t forget to use it, especially if you plan to distribute this on digital media. Include both individual and group images.

One of the most popular books for most non-professionals is a family history. Putting together a simple book that can be shared with your family members can be fun but it is also a lot of work.
Involving your kids, if you have any, can turn this into a family activity. Children and teens alike might like drawing family pets or houses where they’ve lived. Some will warm to the idea of self-portraits. Of course, the trusty cell phone can help them take pictures to include.
At some point, you can help them create a family tree. This can be helpful, but be aware that difficult issues can arise. Think of how each family member will react to the information included: divorces, deceased infants, suicides, adoptions, and other events may not be known by everyone who will see this information.
I will post this each month as a reminder to be cautious about information you share. Better safe than sorry!
Consider interviewing relatives, too; their stories are often treasures. Ask them for copies of old photographs of people and places. Don’t limit this to family. One of the things that makes these histories so interesting is pictures of friends, places of worship, schools, and favorite vacation spots.
I will be posting a suggestion each month for an activity that will help you focus your efforts. I think most of these can be done in less than four hours a month. You can spend more time if your interest is piqued.

 

Creative Spark

“Weeds are flowers, too, once you get to know them.”

(A.A. Milne)

2015-06-24 14.36.28-4

“Golden Hearts” Copyright Melanie Arrowood Wilcox

October Events

St. Francis Day

Halloween (31)

 

AUGUST 28, 2018

Creating a Family History in 2018

What sports does your family play? Gather photos of different activities and generations. Remember that school pictures often include teams and practices. Are there band members in your family?

Don’t forget that adults played sports and there may be photos of them to include. Military, church, and community centers sometimes distribute photos to team members.

One of the most popular books for most non-professionals is a family history. Putting together a simple book that can be shared with your family members can be fun but it is also a lot of work.
Involving your kids, if you have any, can turn this into a family activity. Children and teens alike might like drawing family pets or houses where they’ve lived. Some will warm to the idea of self-portraits. Of course, the trusty cell phone can help them take pictures to include.
At some point, you can help them create a family tree. This can be helpful, but be aware that difficult issues can arise. Think of how each family member will react to the information included: divorces, deceased infants, suicides, adoptions, and other events may not be known by everyone who will see this information.
I will post this each month as a reminder to be cautious about information you share. Better safe than sorry!
Consider interviewing relatives, too; their stories are often treasures. Ask them for copies of old photographs of people and places. Don’t limit this to family. One of the things that makes these histories so interesting is pictures of friends, places of worship, schools, and favorite vacation spots.
I will be posting a suggestion each month for an activity that will help you focus your efforts. I think most of these can be done in less than four hours a month. You can spend more time if your interest is piqued.

Commitment to Your Art

One of the tasks I have set for myself is to update my profiles on social media sites. Many changes have occurred in my life over the last decade. Some of my experiences were life-changing. Some were developmental intellectually and emotionally. All have changed me. I consider that a good thing; there is something sad about a living creature that never grows, never learns, never becomes.

My priorities are dramatically different now. Family is foremost in importance. For a homeschool Mom, that may seem more of the same. The focus is different somehow. I cherish every moment, both good and bad. They are my past and my future. Most importantly, they are my present, the reasons I am happy to wake each day and the calm that lets me sleep at night.

I am blessed with many friends. A few disappeared during hard times; poverty and illness have a way of interfering with some relationships. For everyone I lost, more stepped up. Their patience and willingness to accept the person I am becoming has made difficult times seem surmountable. That has helped me to understand true gratitude and to recognize love in places I overlooked before.

Attempting to communicate all these concepts to family, friends, and colleagues is daunting. Who needs to know? And what should I say?

There are quite a few “unmentionable” topics: politics, religion, money, personal relationships, and illness. Strangely, there are some who want to discuss the taboo ideas and some who steadfastly want no mention of them.

I have decided to err on the side of honesty and trust. We took a hit in the Great Recession. So did many, many other people. I had major health issues. So did many other people. I have unresolved anger issues about where our nation is heading. Like many others I have no true solution to our problems; I choose not to share my opinions as much as before and listen to ideas that may enlighten my own.

My life is changing. I am still growing, developing, and becoming. What more could I ask?


Creative Spark

“Life is a lot like jazz – it’s best when you improvise.”

(George Gershwin)

Pyromancer

September Events

Labor Day

Autumn Begins

 

JULY 24, 2018

Commitment to Your Art

Sometimes I feel overwhelmed by my inability to concentrate on my creative work. Mostly this occurs when life intervenes. Someone is sick, dinner needs to be cooked, or bills need to be paid. Any distraction and my thoughts turn to the mundane; gone are the birds of my imagination.

I’ve learned some coping mechanisms over the years. I write ideas into my calendar for future reference. This helps me to jog my memory when I do have time but lack inspiration. I also list some quick musings in my task app on my cell phone. That requires less time and keeps them available wherever I am. I also save images I find online that trigger a story plot or suggest a drawing.

Like many others, I sometimes withdraw from the world around me. I put the electronics aside, retrieve the tools of my trade, and just work. I don’t worry about whether it is “good” or not. I am just opening the cage door so my birds can fly free.

These activities work for me.

Creating a Family History in 2018 

Gather photos of past and present pets. Record a few memories of each one. How did they join your family? Ask your family members to draw pictures of them. These can be fun; not only do they record the pets’ impact on the family but also show your family members’ fondness for specific animals.

Consider doing similar stories about family gardens or the flowers raised by a family member.

One of the most popular books for most non-professionals is a family history. Putting together a simple book that can be shared with your family members can be fun but it is also a lot of work.
Involving your kids, if you have any, can turn this into a family activity. Children and teens alike might like drawing family pets or houses where they’ve lived. Some will warm to the idea of self-portraits. Of course, the trusty cell phone can help them take pictures to include.
At some point, you can help them create a family tree. This can be helpful, but be aware that difficult issues can arise. Think of how each family member will react to the information included: divorces, deceased infants, suicides, adoptions, and other events may not be known by everyone who will see this information.
I will post this each month as a reminder to be cautious about information you share. Better safe than sorry!
Consider interviewing relatives, too; their stories are often treasures. Ask them for copies of old photographs of people and places. Don’t limit this to family. One of the things that makes these histories so interesting is pictures of friends, places of worship, schools, and favorite vacation spots.
I will be posting a suggestion each month for an activity that will help you focus your efforts. I think most of these can be done in less than four hours a month. You can spend more time if your interest is piqued.

 


Creative Spark

“Everyone discusses my art and pretends to understand, as if it were necessary to understand, when it is simply necessary to love.”

(Claude Monet)

August Events

Hiroshima Peace Day

JUNE 26, 2018

Creating a Family History in 2018

Take pictures of your favorite haunts in your city. These can be hamburger joints, parks, sports arenas, fairgrounds, drive-ins, and other memorable venues. Include friends and family who accompanied you; if you met them for the first time there, mention it.

If you have the opportunity, visit other cities. Beach or mountain trips, camping, and other favorite vacations are good inclusions.

One of the most popular books for most non-professionals is a family history. Putting together a simple book that can be shared with your family members can be fun but it is also a lot of work.
Involving your kids, if you have any, can turn this into a family activity. Children and teens alike might like drawing family pets or houses where they’ve lived. Some will warm to the idea of self-portraits. Of course, the trusty cell phone can help them take pictures to include.
At some point, you can help them create a family tree. This can be helpful, but be aware that difficult issues can arise. Think of how each family member will react to the information included: divorces, deceased infants, suicides, adoptions, and other events may not be known by everyone who will see this information.
I will post this each month as a reminder to be cautious about information you share. Better safe than sorry!
Consider interviewing relatives, too; their stories are often treasures. Ask them for copies of old photographs of people and places. Don’t limit this to family. One of the things that makes these histories so interesting is pictures of friends, places of worship, schools, and favorite vacation spots.
I will be posting a suggestion each month for an activity that will help you focus your efforts. I think most of these can be done in less than four hours a month. You can spend more time if your interest is piqued.

Commitment to Your Art

Read, attend exhibits, and performances. Know your field.

Keep up with professional journals. There are many available in every artistic area: art, writing, music, dance, and theater. These can provide new insights into the work of your colleagues and information on conferences and calls for submissions.

Few careers are as lonely as the creative ones. That doesn’t have to be the case, and shouldn’t. Knowing what other creative and innovative people are working on can keep your mind alive and engaged with the world beyond your doorstep.

 

 


Creative Spark

“There is a solitude, which each and every one of us has always carried with him, more inaccessible than the ice-cold mountains, more profound than the midnight sea; the solitude of self. Our inner being, which we call ourself, no eye nor touch of man or angel has ever pierced.”

(Elizabeth Cady Stanton)

Tea by the Sea

July Events

Independence Day

“Cheshire Cat Moon”

My flash fable, “Cheshire Cat Moon,” will appear in Soundings East, to be released in May 2018. This is one of my personal favorites. It is a midnight tale of life in the forest. 

Melanie Arrowood Wilcox is a North Carolina native and a Carolina graduate with a Bachelor’s in Journalism. A writer and artist, her themes often involve spiritual issues presented as fables or modern interpretations of old texts. More information about Melanie is available at:

https://www.linkedin.com/in/melaniewilcoxauthorandartist/